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Flutelope, the New Plastic Free Envelope Choice for the Planet

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Back in the 1950s, when the world’s population was around 2.5 billion, we were globally producing around 1.5 million tons of plastic that year. Our population has now grown to over 7 billion, and we are now producing a staggering 320 million tons of plastic per year. 8 million tons of that waste has found its way into our precious and beautiful oceans.

If you want to make a difference to the environment and are keen to promote the welfare of our planet with all your packaging requirements, then we are proud to introduce our brand new, totally plastic-free Flutelope.

Welcome to Flutelope

Flutelope is the brand new fully recyclable, environmentally-friendly packaging alternative by Envelopes LTD , a company based in Loudwater – a hamlet in the parish of Chapping Wycombe in Buckinghamshire, England.

Why Flutelope?

Flutelope contains fully recyclable materials only, making them the perfect packaging solution for the welfare of our planet.

Flutelope is an eco-friendly padded paper bag, which is a sustainable alternative to bubble bags.

What Colours are available?

Flutelope comes in different colours which includes white, black, red and orange.

“Flutelope contains fully recyclable materials only, making them the perfect packaging solution for the welfare of our planet.”

What are other packaging manufacturers offering?

Historically, many packaging manufacturers sealed the paper packaging to the plastic bubble part of envelopes.

In an attempt to aid the recycling of the product, they ensured that the plastic bubble element of their packaging was only attached to the seams of the paper. This was done to ease the separation between bubbles and paper to make it simpler for recycling.

However, although this allowed the paper packaging to be separated from the hazardous plastics, customers were still left with totally unrecyclable bubble plastic to dispose of.

Added to the problems that arise when attempting to separate the recyclable paper from the plastic bubble wrap, manufacturers of traditional kinds of packaging also use a plastic coating on the paper to give a waterproof finish.

Can you recycle bubble wrap?

Padded envelopes containing plastic bubble wrap can sometimes be advertised as ‘suitable for recycling’.

So although traditional bubble envelope manufacturers and retailers often claim their products are eco-friendly this is not the case.

Plastic  has been sealed to the paper, added to the fact that the paper envelope has almost certainly been treated with a substance containing plastic for waterproofing,

According to recycling.co.uk padded envelopes containing bubble wrap are classed as ‘Composite’ materials. This kind of material is usually only recycled at designated areas, such as in Supermarkets. The usual purpose of these ‘collection points’ is to recycle plastic bags.

Toxic gases

The plastic element in traditional plastic bubble bags is a real issue in terms of recycling in the U.K. at present. Much of our plastic waste is sent abroad, where it can be difficult to track what happens. Some plastic waste is recycled into new products. However, the countries that our waste is being sent too often lack sufficient infrastructure to deal with reprocessing.

The sad news is, that these toxic plastics are sometimes burnt or added to our already overflowing landfill. Traditional plastic bubble wrap packaging is non biodegradable and can give off seriously toxic gases when burnt.

“The plastic element in traditional plastic bubble bags is a real issue

in terms of recycling in the U.K.” Choose sustainable!

By using Flutelopes you guarantee to make sure you are choosing ethical packaging which is safer for the environment and the world in which you live, for all your personal and commercial packaging requirements.

Envelopes LTD are leading the way with 100% recyclable packaging, which not only protects your deliveries from damage but helps you make the soundest environmental, earth aware and ecologically responsible choices.

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